HCV Basics and Treatments

The following fact sheets provide essential information on the most commonly prescribed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to treat and effectively cure the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The fact sheets include information on how the medication is taken, treatment duration for different genotypes and stages of liver disease, side effects, and some drug-drug interactions. There are also fact sheets covering the basics of testing and diagnosis, understanding genotypes, and issues related to difficult-to-treat subtypes. When diagnosed with HCV, you can review the fact sheets and ask medical questions with your doctor.

Full fact sheets (excluding sofosbuvir/daclatasvir and Mavyret/Maviret, and which include some older DAA regimens) can be found in one PDF here:
Download the fact sheet in English here.
Download the fact sheet in Spanish here.

Sovaldi (Sofosbuvir)
An oral DAA that must be used in combination with another DAA to achieve high SVR rates.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Harvoni (Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir)
Two DAA combination, multi-genotypic regimen in one pill.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Daklinza (Daclatasvir)
Often taken once daily with sofosbuvir. Patents have been withdrawn or allowed to lapse in most countries and currently licensed in the Medicines Patent Pool for generic manufacturing.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Sofosbuvir/Daclatasvir
Generic, fixed dosed combination of two DAAs, either taken as one pill or as two separate pills, that can treat all genotypes (pangenotypic) of HCV. Not available in the US and some high-income countries due to patent barriers.
Download the fact sheet in English here.
Download the fact sheet in Spanish here.

Epclusa (Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir)
Fixed dose combination of two DAAs that can treat all genotypes (pangenotypic) of HCV.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Mavyret/Maviret (glecaprevir/pibrentasvir)
Fixed dose, pangenotypic combination of two pills, and taken as three pills once daily.
Download the fact sheet in English here.
Download the fact sheet in Spanish here.

Ribavirin
A HCV-fighting drug that does not work by itself. It is often combined with other DAA regimens. Ribavrin causes birth defects and miscarriage and should not be used by pregnant individuals or their male sexual partners until 6 months after stopping it.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Adherence
Describes the importance of adhering to HCV treatment to achieve a sustained virological response (SVR), or to be effectively cured.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics
Provides the basic steps to getting diagnosed with HCV
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

HCV Genotypes
Knowing your HCV genotype, or genetic variation of the virus, is important information that can help patients and doctors find the most effective treatment.
Access the fact sheet in English and Spanish here.

Responding to Difficult-to-Treat HCV Subtypes
Discusses difficult-to-treat HCV subtypes that are prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, which may have resistance to certain DAA treatment regimens.
Access the fact sheet in English and French here.